The homeless orphan, a special Bible and Tom Holmoe

This blog gives me the opportunity to share some of the interesting details and insights behind some of the articles I write for the Deseret News.

Today I’d like to highlight three articles published in recent weeks. All three were fascinating and compelling in their own unique way.

The first is about Anthony Mulenga, a native of Zambia who has overcome tremendous adversity to realize his dream of becoming a doctor. I first learned about Anthony through a woman in my LDS ward named B.J. Warnick, whose family unofficially adopted Anthony because they wanted him to have a family. The 24-year-old traveled to Utah in May to spend a month with his new family. While in Utah, I was able to hear Anthony tell his incredible story. His parents died of AIDS when he was about 7 years old and he survived on the streets for three or four years. Eventually an organization called Mothers Without Borders found him and changed his life. For the complete inspirational story, visit Deseretnews.com.

Anthony Mulenga used to sleep under the tree behind him in this photo. Today he is a doctor.

Anthony Mulenga used to sleep under the tree behind him in this photo. Today he is a doctor.

In July I received a tip about a remarkable story regarding family history. More than 40 years ago, a man was taking his morning stroll when he found an 1815 Bible in a trash can. Inside the cover the man discovered the genealogy of a family going back to the 1700s. It was written in very neat penmanship. The man knew this was valuable information, so he saved it and passed it to a friend who he knew would would take care of it until it found the right hands. The woman, Gwen Whitlock safeguarded the Bible for four decades until she decided to donate it to the LDS Church’s FamilySearch Library in San Diego. It turns out that the couple who accepted the Bible was in fact the direct descendants of the family listed inside. For the whole story, visit Deseretnews.com.

This 1815 Bible was saved from the trash 40 years ago because of the genealogy information inside the cover. It was recently passed to a direct descendant by miraculous circumstances.

This 1815 Bible was saved from the trash 40 years ago because of the genealogy information inside the cover. It was recently passed to a direct descendant by miraculous circumstances.

Finally, football season is fast approaching. In late June I attended BYU’s football media day and had the opportunity to interview Tom Holmoe, the school’s athletic director. Holmoe is such a busy guy, it took months to secure 30 minutes for an interview, but finally the stars aligned and I was grateful for what he shared. We discussed his conversion to The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, which gradually took place over several years. A series of key individuals, events and lessons helped him to finally make the big decision, and he has never looked back. Read about his spiritual wrestling match at you guessed it, Deseretnews.com.

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Trent Toone

My name is Trent Toone and I’m a journalist for the Deseret News, where I write for a variety of feature sections. I was raised in Northern Utah and graduated from the University of Utah in 2003. Since then I have worked for several newspapers and received various awards over my journalism career. I am the author of “No Excuses, No Regrets: The Eric Weddle Story,” the sports biography of San Diego Chargers safety Eric Weddle. I served an LDS mission to Santiago, Chile, and spent a year teaching seminary. Like my father before me, I am a proud Eagle Scout. My wife Lisa and I have four children and live in Northern Utah. Feel free to contact me by emailing to trent.b.toone (at) gmail (dot) com.

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